• November 21st, 2018
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Duke of Sussex to help youth fight HIV

National
National

Staff Reporter WINDHOEK - Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex yesterday said he would use his position to give youth a platform in the HIV response. The Duke made the remarks at the International Aids conference in Amsterdam, the Netherlands where he is meeting with young people as well as influential leaders in the global HIV response. Thousands of delegates including researchers, campaigners, activists and people living with HIV are attending the 22 International Aids conference amid warnings that “dangerous complacency” may cause an unstoppable resurgence. Prince Harry responded to a question from a young person on how he is going to challenge global partners to partner with the youth in a meaningful way that will bring better results in the HIV response. The Duke said he does not “necessarily have the solutions” but he would provide the platform for young people to be listened to. “The workforce is there and it exists in the younger generation,” commented the Duke. Instead of “slaving away trying to come up with solutions and trying to put one model that fits for everybody” more leaders should be using the younger generation and the experiences that they have. “ “I’m 33-years and I already feel out of touch,” remarked the Duke of Sussex. He added that there is a trend happening where young people are being listened to. “…But it’s still very much a box ticking exercise. How about we actually make it permanent? Policy does not happen without the people that are going to end up inheriting this planet and inheriting these problems,” said the Duke of Sussex. He also noted the last generation has worked very hard in the area of HIV/AIDS. “And now we’re facing another generation of complacency where a lot of people think it’s solved it’s done. It’s not. This is where it has to start, this is where you guys (young people) are going to take over and solve it,” said Prince Harry. The World Health Organisation (WHO) reported that HIV remains one of the leading causes of death in adolescents in Africa; Lesotho and Botswana have the second and third highest prevalence rates of HIV in the world, and nearly 7,500 young women become newly infected with HIV every week. He previously attended the 21st International AIDS Conference in 2016 in Durban, South Africa where he participated in a special session that discussed issues facing young people living with HIV.
New Era Reporter
2018-07-24 09:27:51 3 months ago

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