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Sean trades music to serve nation

2020-11-27  Strauss Lunyangwe

Sean trades music to serve nation

Sean Naude who was widely known as the Namib-Cowboy in his heyday has taken a step back from the music industry to concentrate on helping others.

Naude, who won the 1997 NBC Music Makers award in the best rock band category and then again in 1999 as a solo artist, told Entertainment Now! he decided in 1997 to serve the country, its people and wildlife as he has a passion for Namibia. 
“I decided in 1997 to serve officials on the ground as I often saw them alone on scenes so I would stop, assist and even clean up the scenes which now 24 years later I am still doing,” he said.

Naude’s music career started in 1987 when he was chosen to sing in the Drakensberg Boys Choir, but sadly in Namibia the music industry never received and still does not receive due credit or attention and it is difficult for musicians to make a living as there are very few events, functions or investment in local artists.

Recently he was appointed as deputy of safety and security for the new political party founded by 2019 presidential candidate Dr Panduleni Itula, named Independent Patriots for Change (IPC). “When Dr Itula ran as independent candidate in 2019 I met him and found a man after my own heart – since then I have been actively involved as a patriot,” he explained.
After releasing three solo albums and making cameo appearances at different competitions including riding a Harley Davidson on stage at the NAMAs in 2015, the Namib-Cowboy says music will always be his first love but for now as the owner of an emergency rescue response team with ambulance services he gets very little time to pick up the guitar.

“I will always be the Namib-Cowboy but as a patriot and servant of the nation, I have become sheriff marshall ranger to serve and protect our beloved country. The music industry in Namibia still lacks the support, funding and international exposure it deserves. We have many very talented people in Namibia, but with a small population, limited gigs or events there is not much chance to make a living off music unless recognised and promoted on the international market,” he added.
He advised that musicians should not stop singing, writing new songs, learning to play instruments as music is an international language and good for the soul, and that they should do it for passion and not pay.
– Slunyangwe@nepc.com.na


2020-11-27  Strauss Lunyangwe

Tags: Khomas
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