• July 6th, 2020

Word On The Block by the Namibian Police - Understanding requirements to possess firearms


The Arms and Ammunition Act, 1996 (Act 7 of 1996), deals with the regulation of firearms and ammunition in Namibia. It makes provision for the requirements to apply for a licence to possess firearms by the public and regulates the control over the possession of arms and ammunition. If further regulates the dealing in, importation, exportation and manufacture of arms and ammunition. The legislation requires that every individual who intends to possess a firearm should obtain a license. The following procedures and requirements are important and should be adhered to: 

For new or first applicants, it is crucial that they acquire firearms from reputable gun dealers and they must provide the following documents:
Copy of  applicant’s ID 
Complete a Pol 151 form
Revenue stamp of N$ 100 for each application 
Proof of safe (receipt or safe inspection by a police officer)
Two passport photos 
Purchase receipt of firearm from the dealer
Clear motivation as to why a firearm is required 
For the application for a second-hand firearm sold privately, the following criteria apply:
Copy of applicant’s ID 
Complete a Pol 151 form
Revenue stamp of N$ 50-00 for each application
Proof of safe (receipt of safe inspection by a Police Officer) 
Two passport photos 
Statement from the current or license holder stating that he/she have sold, gave  etc. such firearm  to the applicant, copy  of ID and copy of license 
Clear motivation as to why a firearm is required 

For anyone who is in the position to inherit a firearm, originally used by someone else, he or she should adhere to the following requirements:
Copy of the applicant’s ID 
Complete a Pol 151 form
Revenue stamp of N$ 50-00  for each application
Proof of safe (receipt or safe inspection by a police officer)
Two passport photos 
Copy of the deceased’s ID
Copy of license(s)
Copy of death certificate
Letter of executor or last will
Statement from the surviving or spouse or three (relatives with an indication of their ID numbers. Or 1. Copy of the ID 2. Copy of license(s) 3. Statement from the licence holder stating that he/she intends to issue such arm to the applicant
The Arms and Ammunition Act 7 of 1996 also prohibits, among others:
Anyone to possess a firearm without a license
The  sale of arms or ammunition by an auctioneer, on instructions given by a staff member in the Public Service, the sale of arms or ammunition by any officer of a court of law in the execution of his or her duties;
The sale, by any person, of arms or ammunition held in stock by any person whose dealer’s licence or permit to manufacture arms or ammunition has been cancelled or has ceased to be valid in terms of the provisions of this Act 
The sale by an authorised manufacturer to a licensed dealer of arms and ammunition manufactured by such manufacturer
Any person contravening the provisions of the Arms and Ammunition Act stands a chance of being prosecuted. The primary purpose of acquiring firearms should be specific and not go beyond reasons of self-defence, protection of one’s properties, professional trophy hunting, and other legitimates use of firearms. Firearms should not be used to commit crimes like gender-based violence, armed robberies or harm to others. Furthermore, the process of owning a rifle or pistol should be legitimate in accordance with the Arms and Ammunition Act, 1996.


Staff Reporter
2020-03-18 07:30:31 | 3 months ago

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