• October 16th, 2019

Students share views on NSFAF funding



Paheja Siririka

WINDHOEK -  Youth Corner this week spoke to students from the University of Namibia (Unam), Namibia University of Science and Technology (Nust) and the International University of Management (IUM) on their views regarding 12 000 students who will not be funded by the institution and their views on last week’s demonstration for funding. 

Frieda Mukufa
Institution: Nust
Course: Masters of English and Applied Linguistics (final year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
NSFAF should revisit their decision. The criteria for choosing suitable candidates to fund should also be re-checked. With the issue of the government only funding specific fields is unfair because students will end up studying courses they are not interested in. The president’s comment on the issue is not helping. As for the demonstration, I am assuming NSFAF knew it was going to happen. I hope they in the meantime are thinking of a strategy to fund those students. NSFAF should adopt the policy of funding students and do away with refunds, that’s a better alternative. 

Raizaldo Hangula
Institution: Nust
Course: Bachelor of Economics (1st year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
I want to address the issue of the new NSFAF building. Acquiring a new building worth millions and immediately cutting funding of students is questionable. I would ask them (NSFAF) how they could get a new building and not fund students. It is difficult to not have anything and it seems NSFAF doesn’t realise that. We all have life struggles, it is disappointing to find out that those who should make students’ lives bearable are making it worse. Those who are running NSFAF shouldn’t forget where they come from.

Celice van Wyk
Institution: Nust 
Course: Bachelor of Tourism Innovation and Development (1st year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
I am one of those applicants whose submission got approved but yet I am not being funded. Them not funding me is affecting me in many ways. My parents are pensioners and we were depending on the support of the fund. It’s affecting my examinations because I honestly don’t know where to go now. NSFAF was very wrong. The comment made by the president on the issue is insensitive and it comes off as if he doesn’t care. I was hurt by that. 
I was impressed with the drive the students had about the demonstration.

Tinashe Mpunzwana
Institution: Nust 
Course: Bachelor of Engineering-Mining (2nd year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
As an international student in Namibia, it pains me to see my fellow brothers and sisters being rejected by an organisation tasked to assist them. An idea that I would give NSFAF is to reduce the refunds/stipends it gives to the students and fund those who have met the criteria because I am sure there are many who have all the necessary documentation but could not be approved because of the limited resources. The refunds NSFAF give is a lot. I am skeptical on whether the demonstration will be effective.

Junias Martin
Institution: IUM 
Course: Bachelor of Education (1st year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
NSFAF funding which is 19 percent of qualified applicants is unfair. We thought those included are the ones with high marks but some of us have high marks and yet not accepted. There are those that have low marks but are accepted. Something else that I came across is there are students who haven’t registered for this year but are part of the NSFAF payroll. The demonstration held last week was powerful. I was part of it; we hope NSFAF will revert back to us so that the dues owed to institutions can be paid before the final results are released.

Kim Neumann
Institution: IUM
Course: Bachelor of Finance Management (2nd year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
This whole situation happening regarding NSFAF not funding students is quite pathetic. The government has a tendency of having their priorities mixed and not funding relevant projects. If NSFAF can prioritise and fund students, the government will stand a better chance of benefitting more from an educated society. There are many things the government is not paying attention to. If you think about it, these young educated Namibians are going to be giving back so much to the economy in terms of job creation and building businesses. 

Leigh-Ann Izaaks
Institution: IUM
Course: Certificate in Office Administration (six months)
Source of funding: Self-funded
I applied for a loan but because of my father’s pay slip which was not there, my application was rejected. That is unfair because my father doesn’t live with me. The relationship bond is not there. How should children feel, whose parent aren’t in their lives,? This is unfair of the fund to do that to some of us. They must come up with a plan and fund students who meet the set criteria. 
I hope the demonstration made an impact because realistically speaking, we all know not all parents can afford to pay for their children’s education. 

Kenny Sakaria
Institution: IUM
Course: Bachelor of Education (1st year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
Some of us have dropped out of school because of financial difficulties and it is inhumane and unfair with NSFAF adding salt to the wound. We are faced with a lot of challenges, all in the quest to be educated. 
The demonstration will not be effective because they haven’t replied yet and it has been a week now. The ministry said they will study the paper. How do you study the paper if all we need is just funding? The government needs to re-think this through.

Nestory Nangolo
Institution: IUM
Course: Bachelor of Education (3rd year)
Source of funding: Funded by NSFAF
It’s a big deal to not be funded. I know some parents are capable of funding their children’s education and there are those who can’t afford it. It is a burden and some students will turn to the streets. This will increase poverty which will eventually contribute to the poor standards of living in Namibia. 
I was part of the demonstration that took place last week and I honestly don’t think it will be effective. Students need to take more realistic steps. Last year, we had a demonstration about institutions where they were urged to allow indebted students to sit for the examinations, which was more fruitful. As students, we need to go back to the drawing board and think of ways to tackle this pertinent issue.
 

Denis Kamati
Institution: IUM
Course: Bachelor of Marketing Management (2nd year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
It’s unfair for other students who have not been approved. Some of them don’t even live with their parents. They need to be funded. I don’t think the government will take that demonstration seriously. As much as it was peaceful and with good intention, I don’t think the government will give in to the demands of the students. 

Brandon Honeb
Institution: Unam
Institution: Bachelor of Business Administration (1st year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
It’s disappointing and stressful especially for a person like me that has been applying for NSFAF funding for many years. The reason given was I was doing a diploma and now that I am done and pursuing a degree, there are still issues. They changed the system. We don’t know what to do and the future looks blurry. Some of us are not sure if we are coming back for the second semester. Things look really rough now. 
As for the demonstration, I am happy that it happened because the situation is not good that we are in. Students need to be financially assisted. I just hope things change now with the grievances given by the students.
 

Uamanguavi Tjizembisa
Institution: Unam
Course: Bachelor of Statistics and Population Studies (4th year)
Source of funding: Funded by NSFAF
I am very disappointed in the approach by NSFAF. The right to education of those that meet the criteria and was not approved have been infringed and that’s unconstitutional. The fact that fellow students will be on the streets soon if NSFAF doesn’t do something quick pains me. That’s not the Namibia we know. 
Regarding the demonstration, I would have loved to take part in it but I was writing exams. I feel the demonstration will soon have fruitful results. It sent out signals that we are worried and aggrieved, we don’t appreciate how the government is handling student affairs right now. I am hoping everything turns out well.
 

Ivy Harodoes
Institution: Unam
Course: Bachelor of Education (3rd year)
Source of funding: Self-funded
It’s a horrible thing NSFAF has done because a lot of students depend on those funds. Due to NSFAF’s decisions, students will not be having access to education. Now it is going to be a disappointment to them for not being able to pursue their dreams. 
Personally, I feel the demonstration will be an eye-opener for those running NSFAF. They will see the money they give to students have an impact on their lives with the hope of being able to realise they need to fund those students, provided criteria set are met.
 

Klaudia Shatipamba
Institution: Unam
Course: Bachelor of Accounting (3rd year)
Source of funding: Funded by NSFAF
NSFAF only funded those students due to the availability of funds, if they had more money, they would have catered to more students. The issue that should be addressed is students who are not paying back the loans, they are the ones who are somehow contributing to this ordeal also. The demonstration showed that students are uncertain of their future and they voiced it out very well. I am however disappointed about the president’s comment on the matter. I fully agree with the higher education minister who said we should be thankful to the ruling Swapo party. In the first place they introduced NSFAF and that is something to be grateful for. Imagine if there was no NSFAF.


Staff Reporter
2019-06-05 10:11:51 4 months ago

Be the first to post a comment...